Super Quick Shot: Public Libraries, Public Policies, and Political Processes: Serving and Transforming Communities in Times of Economic and Political Constraint & why I should take notes

It’s been a long time since my last post, mostly due to life barreling forward and me spinning on the insides.

I started out a come back to the site by reading several professional library books. I didn’t have a focus on a particular subject, but generally focused on politics, reference services, and suggested professional competencies. Out of all that I read, there is one book that rose above the rest.

I have found that the library professional books I have come across become same-y sounding, follow similar formats, or, especially thin volumes, skim the surface of an issue/topic. Public Libraries, Public Policies, and Political Processes: Serving and Transforming Communities in Times of Economic and Political Constraint by Paul T Jaeger, Ursula Gorham, John Carlo Bertot , and Lindsay C. Sarin was able to take a balanced approach to the perception of public libraries in politics, mixing historical context and founded foresight. Especially in today political climate, it has an eerie feel of prophecy to it (like many dystopian novels, including The Handmaid’s Tale and Prophecy of the Sower).

What wonderful things do I remember from it?

*attempts to access long term, iron clad, photographic memory from late February*

[ERROR]

Well, that’s embarrassing. It’s also a lesson in what to do if you intend on providing a review or insight on something.

What do I remember? It wasn’t a brief description of things I’m learning in my reference graduate course. It isn’t a collection of case studies. It is a text that could be used in a graduate course about libraries within the political landscape. It is a book that places libraries in a realistic present political context.

There have been times during my online graduate courses where it seems people aren’t panicking as much as I am about the future. At times, I know it is easy to set the default to comfortable soap box for discussion posts, but it isn’t the time to be comfortable anymore.

It is definitely the time to remember what you read and be able to bring it up when needed….*cough, cough*

So Question: What do you do if you are preparing a review? Do you take notes?

Public Libraries, Public Policies, and Political Processes: Serving and Transforming Communities in Times of Economic and Political Constraint

written by Paul T Jaeger, Ursula Gorham, John Carlo Bertot , and Lindsay C. Sarin

Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, 2014

Publishers Page

Google Books copy

Quick Shots: From Outreach to Equity: Innovative Models of Library Policy and Practice and The Fundamentals of Collection Development and Management

These two entries into my “been read” pile are on opposite sides of the spectrum, both in scope, length, and depth. However, both did contribute to my understanding and I did end up purchasing one of them.

From Outreach to Equity: Innovative Models of Library Policy and Practice

Edited by Robin Osborne

Foreword by Carla D. Hayden

Chicago: American Library Association, 2004

This is a slim volume that contains several “snapshots” of outreach programs and services from the United States created by the Office for Literacy and Outreach Services (now Office for Diversity, Literacy, and Outreach Services). Each part focuses on a different aspect of outreach, beginning with a short introduction and followed by relevant “snapshots”. This book covers a wide array of possible services, but does not provide in depth descriptions of the creation, implementation, and evaluation of these services. That being said, I was writing down the ideas that interested me and by the end had a lengthy list.

Being an older volume, this is cheap to pick up used online. I got it for $.88 from Better World Books and the shipping was $3.99.

You can also view large portions through Google Books.

If you are looking for inspiration for outreach services in a public or academic library, this could prove useful. If you want a step by step description on how to implement these programs in your library, it won’t give you what you need. However, you can take the information in the book and contact these libraries to start a conversation.

 

The Fundamentals of Collection Development and Management

by Peggy Johnson

Third Edition

Chicago: American Library Association, 2013

 

This is a long volume that is focused on the aspects of collection development and management. It goes in depth on the topic, providing a historical context for the topic at the beginning and considering all library types throughout each topic. This is prime textbook material, which may be why you can’t get it on Amazon currently (as the semester has started). I acquired mine through the library and suggested it for inclusion in the soon to be developed professional collection at my library.

This can be used by a wide variety of librarians and information professionals. It takes into consideration how professional values influence the collection development and management. There are many sources cited and suggested readings listed for further context and information.

Whereas From Outreach to Equity was a quick read, this will take more time to consume. The amount of information and the textbook tone require more focus.

Overall, it is valuable for anyone looking to get a well developed idea of what collection development and management can entail. It is the most recent edition of the book and therefore fairly recent.

Here is a link to the Google Books preview, which provides a eBook copy for $48.
Phew!

Weekend Reflections 10/3/2015

What I have enjoyed this week in story time is taking the time to slow down and let the children speak. Story time is not time for prim and proper behavior.

One child during a story time raised her hand. I told her she didn’t need to do that, that she could just tell me what she wanted. She told me how someone she knew, who looked like me, told her that when she felt happy she needed to write in her happy journal and when she was sad she needed to write in her sad journal. I could have told her I wanted to start story time and couldn’t take questions. I could have lost that connection.

Flipside, you get moments when a child says “My daddy said what the heck!”

Both are valued in different ways by myself, but both children got an equal message:

I want to hear your voice.

Image from Goodwill Librarian on Facebook.