Super Quick Shot: Personal Finance in Your 20s & 30s

Anyone else feel that when they revisit an old site, it seems you were active around the same time last year? Does it seem like your mood has its own seasons and schedules? I feel like this is true for myself. Look at the activity feed for my site, the last time this page had a heartbeat it was a weak one.

Remember “a new year, a new you”? The phrase that swept the headlines and campaign titles in every inch of banner space or seasonal signage at stores? Anyone feeling the newness yet? It seems that long term changes don’t just happen – they build up. Step by step.

So here is a quick heart beat review

Personal Finance in Your 20s & 30s by Eric Tyson, MBA – 2018

Part of the For Dummies series, I have found this book to be a no nonsense explanation of how to get a temperature read on your current financial situation. Having not had my finger on my wallet’s pulse the last few hectic years of a master’s program and job changes, being told I could get a credit history and score free was refreshing.

The book covers a range of topics including budgeting, taxes, retirement, investing, money & relationships, and insurance. Tyson provides free solutions when available and advice on when and how to find professional help.

This is a great book for anyone headed off to college and swimming in a sea of credit card advertisements. It is helpful for me, someone who is still paying down my undergrad debt and managing to get a masters with a part time job.

I acquired my copy from the library, but this book comes in at around $19.99. Take a gander at the table of contents to see if you need the whole thing or only pieces. Eric Tyson has other publications on personal finances and investing as well.


Phew! A quick one, but there it is.

Advertisements

Super Quick Shot: Public Libraries, Public Policies, and Political Processes: Serving and Transforming Communities in Times of Economic and Political Constraint & why I should take notes

It’s been a long time since my last post, mostly due to life barreling forward and me spinning on the insides.

I started out a come back to the site by reading several professional library books. I didn’t have a focus on a particular subject, but generally focused on politics, reference services, and suggested professional competencies. Out of all that I read, there is one book that rose above the rest.

I have found that the library professional books I have come across become same-y sounding, follow similar formats, or, especially thin volumes, skim the surface of an issue/topic. Public Libraries, Public Policies, and Political Processes: Serving and Transforming Communities in Times of Economic and Political Constraint by Paul T Jaeger, Ursula Gorham, John Carlo Bertot , and Lindsay C. Sarin was able to take a balanced approach to the perception of public libraries in politics, mixing historical context and founded foresight. Especially in today political climate, it has an eerie feel of prophecy to it (like many dystopian novels, including The Handmaid’s Tale and Prophecy of the Sower).

What wonderful things do I remember from it?

*attempts to access long term, iron clad, photographic memory from late February*

[ERROR]

Well, that’s embarrassing. It’s also a lesson in what to do if you intend on providing a review or insight on something.

What do I remember? It wasn’t a brief description of things I’m learning in my reference graduate course. It isn’t a collection of case studies. It is a text that could be used in a graduate course about libraries within the political landscape. It is a book that places libraries in a realistic present political context.

There have been times during my online graduate courses where it seems people aren’t panicking as much as I am about the future. At times, I know it is easy to set the default to comfortable soap box for discussion posts, but it isn’t the time to be comfortable anymore.

It is definitely the time to remember what you read and be able to bring it up when needed….*cough, cough*

So Question: What do you do if you are preparing a review? Do you take notes?

Public Libraries, Public Policies, and Political Processes: Serving and Transforming Communities in Times of Economic and Political Constraint

written by Paul T Jaeger, Ursula Gorham, John Carlo Bertot , and Lindsay C. Sarin

Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, 2014

Publishers Page

Google Books copy