Review: Teaching Information Literacy Reframed: 50+ Framework-Based Exercises for Creating Information-Literate Learners

Teaching Information Literacy Reframed: 50+ Framework-Based Exercises for Creating Information-Literate Learners

Joanna M. Burkhardt

2016, ALA Neal-Schuman, Chicago

Obtained: Checked out copy from public library.

Why did I get it?: I was seeking texts on information literacy in the library. I did not look into the content of this book when I initially put it on hold and found after I received it that it was aimed at academic settings. However, I found worth and application in it anyhow.

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The Association of College & Research Libraries (ACRL) created the Information Literacy Competency Standards for High Education in 2000 to help define standards for information literacy. These standards have been replaced with the ACRL’s Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education which was adopted by the ACRL Board on January 11, 2016. The Framework was created to address the changing responsibilities of both staff and students and to clearly define the concept of information literacy in the context of practice. The Framework consists of six frames, each representing an internal principle of information literacy.

Burkhardt’s Teaching Information Literacy Reframed aims to help those tasked with creating and implementing information literacy instruction with a toolbox of usable and flexible exercises that help make the concepts concrete. Each of the six frames is given its own chapter, with an introduction and accompanying exercises. The ACRL’s Framework is provided as an Appendix allowing the reader to cross reference between the original document and the author’s interpretation and elaborations on each framework section. Chapters start with an exploration of the concept, defining it and its importance to students. Exercises follow, listing learning objectives and instructions. A handy list of exercises can be found at the beginning of the book following the table of contents. Exercises range from hands on activities to group discussion. Suggestions are made as to if the exercises should be done individually or in groups.

This book provided me with insight into the instructional tasks academic librarians face. Being a graduate student focused on library and information studies, I can see the usefulness of the exercises from two perspectives. As a librarian in training, I find the exercises and explorations of each topic to solidify my professional identity. These concepts are important to my profession and this is one way of making it applicable and important to others. As a student, these are the concepts I put into practice every semester when completing assignments.

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Do I recommend it?: Being a slimmer volume with high readability and focusing on information literacy concepts, I do recommend it. It’s aimed at instructors, but can be useful for undergrad and graduate students for self guided exercises or for developing information and/or education professionals wanting to see the application of of information literacy concepts in an instructional setting.

Freebies:

Sample of the Book on ALA Store:

Title page, bibliographic info, table of contents, list of exercise titles (with page numbers), Introduction, Chapter One (with citations), & index.

http://www.alastore.ala.org/pdf/9780838913970_sample.pdf

ACRL Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education

http://www.ala.org/acrl/standards/ilframework

ACRL’s former Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education

*This document is being phased out to make way for the Framework. It was decided at the 2016 ALA Annual Conference in Orlando that the Competencies would be rescinded. You can access the document (and PDF) at the link below until July 1, 2017.

http://www.ala.org/acrl/standards/informationliteracycompetency

 

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